Poster or Presentation Title

What are the Physiological Effects of Instrument Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization on Range of Motion in the Lower Extremity

Location

Memorial Ballroom, Hall Campus Center

Access Type

Campus Access Only

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Start Date

7-4-2021 12:00 PM

End Date

7-4-2021 1:15 PM

Department

Athletic Training

Abstract

Clinical scenario: Loss of joint range of motion (ROM) is a recurrent condition in physically active people and may increase susceptibility to musculoskeletal injury. Instrument assisted soft tissue mobilization (IASTM) is an effective treatment option for increasing ROM that clinicians can use throughout rehabilitation. However, IASTM alone does not address all physiological aspects associated with ROM. Numerous factors can contribute to loss of ROM, including lack of flexibility, previous injury and immobilization. In addition, it has been exhibited that reduced joint ROM in the lower extremities decreases movement efficiency such as walking, running, and squatting.

Clinical question: What are the physiological effects of instrument assisted soft tissue mobilization on range of motion in the lower extremity? Clinical Bottom line: There is consistent evidence supporting the physiological effects of IASTM on ROM in the lower extremity. Current research suggests that static stretching, foam rolling, and other forms of IASTM may also be effective treatment options for individuals needing to improve lower extremity ROM. Therefore, IASTM can be used as the primary treatment for ROM improvement but should be completed in combination with other flexibility improvement interventions.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Bradney
Dr. Bowman
Dr. Aronson

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Apr 7th, 12:00 PM Apr 7th, 1:15 PM

What are the Physiological Effects of Instrument Assisted Soft Tissue Mobilization on Range of Motion in the Lower Extremity

Memorial Ballroom, Hall Campus Center

Clinical scenario: Loss of joint range of motion (ROM) is a recurrent condition in physically active people and may increase susceptibility to musculoskeletal injury. Instrument assisted soft tissue mobilization (IASTM) is an effective treatment option for increasing ROM that clinicians can use throughout rehabilitation. However, IASTM alone does not address all physiological aspects associated with ROM. Numerous factors can contribute to loss of ROM, including lack of flexibility, previous injury and immobilization. In addition, it has been exhibited that reduced joint ROM in the lower extremities decreases movement efficiency such as walking, running, and squatting.

Clinical question: What are the physiological effects of instrument assisted soft tissue mobilization on range of motion in the lower extremity? Clinical Bottom line: There is consistent evidence supporting the physiological effects of IASTM on ROM in the lower extremity. Current research suggests that static stretching, foam rolling, and other forms of IASTM may also be effective treatment options for individuals needing to improve lower extremity ROM. Therefore, IASTM can be used as the primary treatment for ROM improvement but should be completed in combination with other flexibility improvement interventions.