Poster or Presentation Title

Comparing the Level of Psychological Stress and Well-Being Between Intercollegiate and Club Sports Athletes

Location

Memorial Ballroom, Hall Campus Center

Access Type

Open Access

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Start Date

7-4-2021 12:00 PM

End Date

7-4-2021 1:15 PM

Department

Athletic Training

Abstract

Context: Elevated psychological stress paired with poor lifestyle choices can lead to an increase in injury risk and recovery time. Knowing the possible differences/similarities in these levels between intercollegiate and club sports athletes could better equip health professionals for the possible differences between the two groups of athletes.

Objective: To compare the level of psychological stress and well-being between intercollegiate and club sports athletes to better equip health professionals for the possible differences between the two groups of athletes.

Design: Prospective Cohort Study.

Setting: Online Survey.

Patients or Other Participants: Participants were 108 intercollegiate athletes that participated in NCAA Division III sports or club sports at the 20 NCAA Division III schools in Virginia.

Main Outcome Measure(s): The survey consisted of demographic information (eg, competitive setting, sport played) and 2 sections: (1) modified Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale - 21 Items (DASS-21) and (2) General Well-Being Schedule (GWBS).

Results: There were no significant differences in stress and well-being levels between NCAA Division III intercollegiate athletes and club sports athletes or comparing male athletes and female athletes (P > .05). Injured athletes reported higher stress levels and lower well-being levels when compared to non-injured athletes (P = .001).

Conclusions: Our findings suggested that stress and well-being levels do not contribute to a difference in injury risk between intercollegiate athletes and club sports athletes. Injured athletes reporting higher levels of stress and lower levels of well-being is likely related to the stress of not being able to participate at their desired performance level.

Key Words: injury risk, distress, anxiety, DASS-21, GWBS

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Debbie A Bradney
Dr. Domenica Favero
Dr. Thomas G Bowman

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Apr 7th, 12:00 PM Apr 7th, 1:15 PM

Comparing the Level of Psychological Stress and Well-Being Between Intercollegiate and Club Sports Athletes

Memorial Ballroom, Hall Campus Center

Context: Elevated psychological stress paired with poor lifestyle choices can lead to an increase in injury risk and recovery time. Knowing the possible differences/similarities in these levels between intercollegiate and club sports athletes could better equip health professionals for the possible differences between the two groups of athletes.

Objective: To compare the level of psychological stress and well-being between intercollegiate and club sports athletes to better equip health professionals for the possible differences between the two groups of athletes.

Design: Prospective Cohort Study.

Setting: Online Survey.

Patients or Other Participants: Participants were 108 intercollegiate athletes that participated in NCAA Division III sports or club sports at the 20 NCAA Division III schools in Virginia.

Main Outcome Measure(s): The survey consisted of demographic information (eg, competitive setting, sport played) and 2 sections: (1) modified Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale - 21 Items (DASS-21) and (2) General Well-Being Schedule (GWBS).

Results: There were no significant differences in stress and well-being levels between NCAA Division III intercollegiate athletes and club sports athletes or comparing male athletes and female athletes (P > .05). Injured athletes reported higher stress levels and lower well-being levels when compared to non-injured athletes (P = .001).

Conclusions: Our findings suggested that stress and well-being levels do not contribute to a difference in injury risk between intercollegiate athletes and club sports athletes. Injured athletes reporting higher levels of stress and lower levels of well-being is likely related to the stress of not being able to participate at their desired performance level.

Key Words: injury risk, distress, anxiety, DASS-21, GWBS