Poster or Presentation Title

The Line Between Isn’t and Ain’t: Black English Usage as a Stimulus for Perception Bias and as a Link to Social Attitudes and Cultural Affiliation

Location

Virtual | Room 3

Access Type

Open Access

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

7-4-2021 11:45 AM

End Date

7-4-2021 12:00 PM

Department

Psychology

Abstract

The weight of the stigma placed upon minority speech dialects such as African American Vernacular English and the nuanced practice of code-switching is largely ignored as an academic concern. Moreover, the legitimacy of AAVE as a valid dialect of English is often called into question. Through investigating the history of dialects like AAVE, literature on minority speech usage and discrimination, and the results of a psychological study this research sought to understand the impact of minority speech styles on the environment of speakers and the way in which it reflects their cultural attitudes. By isolating minority language use as its own variable the study hopes to shed light on issues of discrimination and bias based upon non-standard English dialects and the barriers this creates in various avenues of society. Particular attention is given to how AAVE and code-switching impact minority experiences in academic classrooms and mental health fields. Additionally, a focus on how colloquial language is interwoven into minority identity and how this language can be used to denote intersubjective understanding within a community is explored. Results of this study provide insight into an overlooked area of research and provide possible solutions to communication barriers and culturally based stigma.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Virginia Cylke

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Apr 7th, 11:45 AM Apr 7th, 12:00 PM

The Line Between Isn’t and Ain’t: Black English Usage as a Stimulus for Perception Bias and as a Link to Social Attitudes and Cultural Affiliation

Virtual | Room 3

The weight of the stigma placed upon minority speech dialects such as African American Vernacular English and the nuanced practice of code-switching is largely ignored as an academic concern. Moreover, the legitimacy of AAVE as a valid dialect of English is often called into question. Through investigating the history of dialects like AAVE, literature on minority speech usage and discrimination, and the results of a psychological study this research sought to understand the impact of minority speech styles on the environment of speakers and the way in which it reflects their cultural attitudes. By isolating minority language use as its own variable the study hopes to shed light on issues of discrimination and bias based upon non-standard English dialects and the barriers this creates in various avenues of society. Particular attention is given to how AAVE and code-switching impact minority experiences in academic classrooms and mental health fields. Additionally, a focus on how colloquial language is interwoven into minority identity and how this language can be used to denote intersubjective understanding within a community is explored. Results of this study provide insight into an overlooked area of research and provide possible solutions to communication barriers and culturally based stigma.