Poster or Presentation Title

Understanding the Lived Experiences of African American students at predominantly white institutions using a “Dimensions of Wellness” Framework

Location

Virtual | Room 2

Access Type

Open Access

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

7-4-2021 3:30 PM

End Date

7-4-2021 3:45 PM

Abstract

The divisive history behind institutions of higher education hold ramifications that have led to separate and unequal education and a plethora of concerns regarding equity and diversity at institutions of higher education at all levels. Predominantly white institutions of higher education are painted to appear fundamentally equal, as they are now meant to be, yet many individuals may have a surface level understanding of these institutions and therefore see no need for change within these institutions. Through conducting semi-standardized in-depth interviews and drawing from the work of scholars on race, higher education and conflict, including W.E.B Du Bois and Karl Marx, in addition to using a framework that uses the “Dimensions of Wellness” in conjunction with race and college life, this study seeks to understand the lived experiences of African American students at predominantly white institutions, initially focusing on the University of Lynchburg. Additionally, this qualitative research seeks to validate the thesis that African American students at the University of Lynchburg, despite added measures to ensure equity and inclusion, continue to have difficulties in multiple facets of student life as measured by the nine Dimensions of Wellness and group identity. Data derived from this research can be useful for University diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives as well as further scholarly research on African American students at predominantly white institutions across the country.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Sharon Foreman
Dr. Laura Kicklighter
Dr. Paul McClure
Dr. Aaron Smith

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Apr 7th, 3:30 PM Apr 7th, 3:45 PM

Understanding the Lived Experiences of African American students at predominantly white institutions using a “Dimensions of Wellness” Framework

Virtual | Room 2

The divisive history behind institutions of higher education hold ramifications that have led to separate and unequal education and a plethora of concerns regarding equity and diversity at institutions of higher education at all levels. Predominantly white institutions of higher education are painted to appear fundamentally equal, as they are now meant to be, yet many individuals may have a surface level understanding of these institutions and therefore see no need for change within these institutions. Through conducting semi-standardized in-depth interviews and drawing from the work of scholars on race, higher education and conflict, including W.E.B Du Bois and Karl Marx, in addition to using a framework that uses the “Dimensions of Wellness” in conjunction with race and college life, this study seeks to understand the lived experiences of African American students at predominantly white institutions, initially focusing on the University of Lynchburg. Additionally, this qualitative research seeks to validate the thesis that African American students at the University of Lynchburg, despite added measures to ensure equity and inclusion, continue to have difficulties in multiple facets of student life as measured by the nine Dimensions of Wellness and group identity. Data derived from this research can be useful for University diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives as well as further scholarly research on African American students at predominantly white institutions across the country.