Poster or Presentation Title

The Impact of Emotional Intelligence and Situational Academic Stressors on Resilience, Coping, and Well-Being

Student Author Information

Jenna Bohrer, University of LynchburgFollow

Location

Virtual | Room 3

Access Type

Open Access

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

7-4-2021 1:30 PM

End Date

7-4-2021 1:45 PM

Department

Psychology

Abstract

The present study focused on the impact of emotional intelligence and academic stress on coping, resilience, and psychological well-being within a college population. It was hypothesized that those high in emotional intelligence would employ more approach coping strategies and fewer avoidance coping strategies compared to those low in emotional intelligence, and that the higher stress scenario would result in more avoidance and less approach coping compared to the moderate stress scenario. Emotional intelligence was also hypothesized to be a predictor of resilience and well-being. Participants (N=122) completed an online survey where they were asked to complete a measure of emotional intelligence and engage with two hypothetical academic stressors, one moderately stressful and one highly stressful. They then completed a coping assessment following each scenario plus measures of resilience and psychological well-being. Mixed-model ANOVAs revealed that, compared to those with low emotional intelligence, those high in emotional intelligence reported more approach coping strategies and fewer avoidance coping strategies. Contrary to expectations, participants reported higher rates of both avoidance and approach coping in the higher stress scenario than in the moderate stress scenario. Emotional intelligence was also found to be a significant predictor of resilience and psychological well-being.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Marciano
Dr. Favero
Dr. Cylke
Dr. Kicklighter

Rights Statement

The right to download or print any portion of this material is granted by the copyright owner only for personal or educational use. The author/creator retains all proprietary rights, including copyright ownership. Any editing, other reproduction or other use of this material by any means requires the express written permission of the copyright owner. Except as provided above, or for any other use that is allowed by fair use (Title 17, §107 U.S.C.), you may not reproduce, republish, post, transmit or distribute any material from this web site in any physical or digital form without the permission of the copyright owner of the material.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 7th, 1:30 PM Apr 7th, 1:45 PM

The Impact of Emotional Intelligence and Situational Academic Stressors on Resilience, Coping, and Well-Being

Virtual | Room 3

The present study focused on the impact of emotional intelligence and academic stress on coping, resilience, and psychological well-being within a college population. It was hypothesized that those high in emotional intelligence would employ more approach coping strategies and fewer avoidance coping strategies compared to those low in emotional intelligence, and that the higher stress scenario would result in more avoidance and less approach coping compared to the moderate stress scenario. Emotional intelligence was also hypothesized to be a predictor of resilience and well-being. Participants (N=122) completed an online survey where they were asked to complete a measure of emotional intelligence and engage with two hypothetical academic stressors, one moderately stressful and one highly stressful. They then completed a coping assessment following each scenario plus measures of resilience and psychological well-being. Mixed-model ANOVAs revealed that, compared to those with low emotional intelligence, those high in emotional intelligence reported more approach coping strategies and fewer avoidance coping strategies. Contrary to expectations, participants reported higher rates of both avoidance and approach coping in the higher stress scenario than in the moderate stress scenario. Emotional intelligence was also found to be a significant predictor of resilience and psychological well-being.