Poster or Presentation Title

Developing Culture Conditions for Naegleria lovaniensis to Study Treatments of Primary Amoebic Meningoencephalitis

Location

Virtual | Room 4

Access Type

Campus Access Only

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

7-4-2021 11:30 AM

End Date

7-4-2021 11:45 AM

Department

Biomedical Science

Abstract

The Naegleria genus is made up of free-living amoebas that have a wide distribution across soil and fresh-water environments. N. fowleri invokes particular interest due to its causative role in the pathogenesis of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). PAM is a rapidly progressing disease of the Central Nervous System (CNS) that results in death in 97% of cases after infection has occurred. The CDC currently advises the use of miltefosine in combination with several other treatments in identified cases of PAM. Miltefosine has been shown to have an eliminating effect on N. fowleri but the mechanisms of their interaction remain largely undefined. Due to lab constraints on safely handling N. fowleri, our attention has turned to maintaining a closely related environmental isolate, N. lovaniensis. N. lovaniensis has demonstrated similar antigenic traits as N. fowleri, but is non-pathogenic in humans. A standard growth curve of N. lovaniensis grown in axenic PYFNH medium at 37°C is being established. Our goal is to compare this to amoebas treated with miltefosine at a range of concentrations. Our results of experimentation with N. lovaniensis will then be compared to published studies and experiments conducted with N. fowleri to identify potential physiological differences that could constitute N. fowleri’s pathogenicity.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. David Freier

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Apr 7th, 11:30 AM Apr 7th, 11:45 AM

Developing Culture Conditions for Naegleria lovaniensis to Study Treatments of Primary Amoebic Meningoencephalitis

Virtual | Room 4

The Naegleria genus is made up of free-living amoebas that have a wide distribution across soil and fresh-water environments. N. fowleri invokes particular interest due to its causative role in the pathogenesis of primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM). PAM is a rapidly progressing disease of the Central Nervous System (CNS) that results in death in 97% of cases after infection has occurred. The CDC currently advises the use of miltefosine in combination with several other treatments in identified cases of PAM. Miltefosine has been shown to have an eliminating effect on N. fowleri but the mechanisms of their interaction remain largely undefined. Due to lab constraints on safely handling N. fowleri, our attention has turned to maintaining a closely related environmental isolate, N. lovaniensis. N. lovaniensis has demonstrated similar antigenic traits as N. fowleri, but is non-pathogenic in humans. A standard growth curve of N. lovaniensis grown in axenic PYFNH medium at 37°C is being established. Our goal is to compare this to amoebas treated with miltefosine at a range of concentrations. Our results of experimentation with N. lovaniensis will then be compared to published studies and experiments conducted with N. fowleri to identify potential physiological differences that could constitute N. fowleri’s pathogenicity.