Poster or Presentation Title

Assessing The Effects of Limited Cervical Spine Range of Motion on Postural Stability and Cervical Paraspinal Muscle Activity Utilizing a NeuroCom Balance Master

Location

Virtual | Room 4

Access Type

Open Access

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

7-4-2021 1:15 PM

End Date

7-4-2021 1:30 PM

Department

Biomedical Science

Abstract

Investigating the relationship between range of motion and postural stability is important due to the general trend of decreasing cervical spine mobility with age and its potential impact on one’s balance. This study will look at how limited mobility in the cervical spine region can impact one’s balance and muscle activity. Subjects who qualify as having limited range of motion will be recruited for this study. The subjects will undergo baseline testing of their current range of motion, then will go through various postural tests on the NeuroCom Balance Master. The NeuroCom will be used to test postural stability through the use of the Sensory Organization Test (SOT) battery of tests and a dynamic step-quick turn test (SQT), each measuring center of gravity sway. Surface electromyography (EMG) will be conducted to evaluate the activity of cervical musculature. Upon completion of the initial NeuroCom testing and the EMG, a plan of exercises to increase range of motion will be distributed to subjects. Cervical range of motion, surface EMG, and NeuroCom balance testing will be reassessed one month later. My goal is to determine whether or not there is a positive correlation between cervical range of motion and postural stability. The data found in this project could be essential in providing awareness of the importance of range of motion in one’s balance, as well as assessing the impact of cervical paraspinal muscles on the vestibular component of postural stability.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Wendy Williamson

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Apr 7th, 1:15 PM Apr 7th, 1:30 PM

Assessing The Effects of Limited Cervical Spine Range of Motion on Postural Stability and Cervical Paraspinal Muscle Activity Utilizing a NeuroCom Balance Master

Virtual | Room 4

Investigating the relationship between range of motion and postural stability is important due to the general trend of decreasing cervical spine mobility with age and its potential impact on one’s balance. This study will look at how limited mobility in the cervical spine region can impact one’s balance and muscle activity. Subjects who qualify as having limited range of motion will be recruited for this study. The subjects will undergo baseline testing of their current range of motion, then will go through various postural tests on the NeuroCom Balance Master. The NeuroCom will be used to test postural stability through the use of the Sensory Organization Test (SOT) battery of tests and a dynamic step-quick turn test (SQT), each measuring center of gravity sway. Surface electromyography (EMG) will be conducted to evaluate the activity of cervical musculature. Upon completion of the initial NeuroCom testing and the EMG, a plan of exercises to increase range of motion will be distributed to subjects. Cervical range of motion, surface EMG, and NeuroCom balance testing will be reassessed one month later. My goal is to determine whether or not there is a positive correlation between cervical range of motion and postural stability. The data found in this project could be essential in providing awareness of the importance of range of motion in one’s balance, as well as assessing the impact of cervical paraspinal muscles on the vestibular component of postural stability.