Poster or Presentation Title

Experiences of a Summer Internship with the James River Association

Location

Virtual | Room 3

Access Type

Campus Access Only

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

7-4-2021 3:45 PM

End Date

7-4-2021 4:00 PM

Department

Environmental Science

Abstract

This past summer of 2020, I had the opportunity to complete an internship for the James River Association (JRA). Information about the internship first came through a school advertisement presented by one of our College of Sciences professors Dr. Perault. On the form Nat Draper, the Senior Education Manager of JRA, was mentioned and I recognized that he had talked multiple times in my high school environmental science class and led two canoeing expeditions that I attended as well. With the connection I had previously made through partaking in events hosted by JRA alongside my desire to enhance learning and leadership opportunities in an environmental science based job, as that is what I am majoring in, I received a confirmation letter that I would be interning with JRA camps for the summer months of June to July. The camps were a week-long experience in which campers returned daily to participate in activities such as gaining knowledge about the James River and Lynchburg ecosystems, how to fish and kayak, and river safety. Adjustments to the curriculum and recreation would be made each week to accommodate the age differences of campers as they varied from 7-14 years old. As an intern, some of my job responsibilities included ensuring that all campers were accounted for each day, activities were planned so that there was little down time, and that the safety of each camper was guaranteed while on the river. Being an authority figure in these instances, it was my responsibility as camp counselor to lead the campers by example with my actions and words while also being respectful to their wants and needs.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Brooke Haiar

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Apr 7th, 3:45 PM Apr 7th, 4:00 PM

Experiences of a Summer Internship with the James River Association

Virtual | Room 3

This past summer of 2020, I had the opportunity to complete an internship for the James River Association (JRA). Information about the internship first came through a school advertisement presented by one of our College of Sciences professors Dr. Perault. On the form Nat Draper, the Senior Education Manager of JRA, was mentioned and I recognized that he had talked multiple times in my high school environmental science class and led two canoeing expeditions that I attended as well. With the connection I had previously made through partaking in events hosted by JRA alongside my desire to enhance learning and leadership opportunities in an environmental science based job, as that is what I am majoring in, I received a confirmation letter that I would be interning with JRA camps for the summer months of June to July. The camps were a week-long experience in which campers returned daily to participate in activities such as gaining knowledge about the James River and Lynchburg ecosystems, how to fish and kayak, and river safety. Adjustments to the curriculum and recreation would be made each week to accommodate the age differences of campers as they varied from 7-14 years old. As an intern, some of my job responsibilities included ensuring that all campers were accounted for each day, activities were planned so that there was little down time, and that the safety of each camper was guaranteed while on the river. Being an authority figure in these instances, it was my responsibility as camp counselor to lead the campers by example with my actions and words while also being respectful to their wants and needs.