Poster or Presentation Title

An Anti-Racism Introductory Seminar to Combat the Interconnectedness of Medical Racism and Maternal Morbidity and Mortality Rates Among Black Women in the United States.

Student Author Information

Alexandra BoatwrightFollow

Access Type

Campus Access Only

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Department

Nursing

Abstract

Given the massive maternal mortality crisis experienced by Black women in the United States, this thesis will aim to combat one crucial aspect of this problem. Among the top eleven most developed countries in the world, the United States markedly surpasses them all as the leader in maternal mortality despite our leading advancements in biomedical technology. More specifically, this crisis severely impacts Black women in America as this population is much more likely to die of pregnancy related causes than any other racial group in the United States. In response, researchers and organizations have published literature outlining their proposed solution(s); many of which emphasize the importance of creating an education tool that will teach maternal medicine providers about the present-day impact of generational oppression, discrimination, and systemic racism that black women are left grappling with at the expense of their own health. However, preliminary research has found that they are often not required to ever partake in any course or series of training that aim to confront their own perceptions and biases that may, even if unintentionally, inform or persuade their patient care. As a result, the institutional and structural racism that heavily pervades the American healthcare system persists, leading to poor patient care outcomes, satisfaction, relationships, and/or even death. Furthermore, this thesis will focus on creating an evidence based anti-racism introductory session that will serve to enhance provider awareness of not only their own biases but also the impact that medical racism plays in their approach to patient care.

Keywords: maternal reproductive health, medical racism, healthcare professionals, obstetrics and gynecology

Faculty Mentor(s)

Kristen Shargots, Janice Sinoski, Laura Kicklighter

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An Anti-Racism Introductory Seminar to Combat the Interconnectedness of Medical Racism and Maternal Morbidity and Mortality Rates Among Black Women in the United States.

Given the massive maternal mortality crisis experienced by Black women in the United States, this thesis will aim to combat one crucial aspect of this problem. Among the top eleven most developed countries in the world, the United States markedly surpasses them all as the leader in maternal mortality despite our leading advancements in biomedical technology. More specifically, this crisis severely impacts Black women in America as this population is much more likely to die of pregnancy related causes than any other racial group in the United States. In response, researchers and organizations have published literature outlining their proposed solution(s); many of which emphasize the importance of creating an education tool that will teach maternal medicine providers about the present-day impact of generational oppression, discrimination, and systemic racism that black women are left grappling with at the expense of their own health. However, preliminary research has found that they are often not required to ever partake in any course or series of training that aim to confront their own perceptions and biases that may, even if unintentionally, inform or persuade their patient care. As a result, the institutional and structural racism that heavily pervades the American healthcare system persists, leading to poor patient care outcomes, satisfaction, relationships, and/or even death. Furthermore, this thesis will focus on creating an evidence based anti-racism introductory session that will serve to enhance provider awareness of not only their own biases but also the impact that medical racism plays in their approach to patient care.

Keywords: maternal reproductive health, medical racism, healthcare professionals, obstetrics and gynecology