Poster or Presentation Title

Tick Borne Diseases in Dogs: Trends in Virginia and Central Virginian Counties from 2012-2021

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Open Access

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Department

Public Health

Abstract

Title: Tick Borne Diseases in Dogs: Trends in Virginia and Central Virginian Counties from 2012-2021

Authors:

Christina Harris, MPH Candidate, University of Lynchburg

Jennifer L. Hall, EdD, MCHES, Associate Professor, University of Lynchburg

Background: Dogs are at risk for tick-borne diseases and their risk is increasing due to warming weather and increasing tick populations. The Companion Animal Parasite Council (CAPC) monitors state and county testing for Anaplasmosis, Ehrlichiosis and Lyme disease, which are the three most common tick borne diseases (TBD) affecting dogs in the state of Virginia.

Methods: A trends analysis approach was used to analyze publicly available data for the state of Virginia and Central Virginia counties from the Companion Animal Parasite Council (CAPC) over the span of ten years (2012-2021) for Anaplasmosis, Ehrlichiosis and Lyme disease.

Results: The number of dogs affected by Anaplasmosis, Ehrlichiosis and Lyme disease in Virginia has over tripled in the last 10 years, reaching close to 75,000 in 2021. Ehrlichiosis has been the most common tick-borne disease, affecting close to 40,000 dogs in 2021, followed by Lyme disease (30,030) and Anaplasmosis (5,202).

Conclusion: For the past decade, tick-borne diseases in dogs have been increasing in Virginia. This trend is likely going to continue as tick populations increase and expand geographically. There is a need for more tick-borne disease education and prevention programs for pets owners throughout Virginia and Central Virginia.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Jennifer Hall

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Tick Borne Diseases in Dogs: Trends in Virginia and Central Virginian Counties from 2012-2021

Title: Tick Borne Diseases in Dogs: Trends in Virginia and Central Virginian Counties from 2012-2021

Authors:

Christina Harris, MPH Candidate, University of Lynchburg

Jennifer L. Hall, EdD, MCHES, Associate Professor, University of Lynchburg

Background: Dogs are at risk for tick-borne diseases and their risk is increasing due to warming weather and increasing tick populations. The Companion Animal Parasite Council (CAPC) monitors state and county testing for Anaplasmosis, Ehrlichiosis and Lyme disease, which are the three most common tick borne diseases (TBD) affecting dogs in the state of Virginia.

Methods: A trends analysis approach was used to analyze publicly available data for the state of Virginia and Central Virginia counties from the Companion Animal Parasite Council (CAPC) over the span of ten years (2012-2021) for Anaplasmosis, Ehrlichiosis and Lyme disease.

Results: The number of dogs affected by Anaplasmosis, Ehrlichiosis and Lyme disease in Virginia has over tripled in the last 10 years, reaching close to 75,000 in 2021. Ehrlichiosis has been the most common tick-borne disease, affecting close to 40,000 dogs in 2021, followed by Lyme disease (30,030) and Anaplasmosis (5,202).

Conclusion: For the past decade, tick-borne diseases in dogs have been increasing in Virginia. This trend is likely going to continue as tick populations increase and expand geographically. There is a need for more tick-borne disease education and prevention programs for pets owners throughout Virginia and Central Virginia.