Access Type

Open Access

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Department

Athletic Training

Abstract

Acute:Chronic Workload Ratios and Positional Differences in Collegiate Men’s Lacrosse Players

[3 spaces]Phifer MJ*, Collins SM*, Bowman TG*, Wesley Siler CA*: *University of Lynchburg.

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Positional differences in Acute:chronic workload ratios (ACWRs), distance traveled, and activity intensity throughout a season for men’s lacrosse players have not been determined. The purpose of our research was to determine if there were positional differences in ACWRs, distance traveled, and activity intensity in men’s NCAA DIII lacrosse players. We recruited 53 NCAA DIII lacrosse players (age=20.4 years, weight=81.6 kg, height=182.4 cm, Attack=12, O-Mid=14, D-Mid=6, FO=4, Goalie=3, Defense=14) from one team for our cross-sectional study. Sport Performance Tracking (SPT, Melbourne, Australia) GPS units tracked athletes’ACWRs (AU), total distance traveled (m), and intensity (proprietary composite score; AU) for every game and practice of the traditional spring lacrosse season (12 weeks). The units used 10 Hz GPS sampling rates which have been found to be both valid and reliable. There was no interaction present between weekly ACWRs and positions (F5,18=.19, P=.96, ��p2=.05), but there was a main effect for time (F3.75,67.57=10.87 P<.001 ��p2=.38). There were significant interactions between session type and positions for total distance traveled (F5,2406=8.09 P=<.001 ��p2=.02) and between-session type and positions for intensity (F5,2406=12.13 P<.001 ��p2=.03). Although ACWRs were similar across positions, they varied across the 9 weeks of the traditional season suggesting varying levels of injury risk. Several positions had significant differences between games for intensity, distance traveled, or both. In all situations, players had higher intensities or total distance traveled in games compared to practices. GPS data can be used to prepare practice plans that reduce injury susceptibility and prepare players for game demands.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Bowman Dr. Collins Caroline Siler

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Acute:Chronic Workload Ratios and Positional Differences in Collegiate Men’s Lacrosse Players

Acute:Chronic Workload Ratios and Positional Differences in Collegiate Men’s Lacrosse Players

[3 spaces]Phifer MJ*, Collins SM*, Bowman TG*, Wesley Siler CA*: *University of Lynchburg.

[Blank Line]

[Blank Line]

Positional differences in Acute:chronic workload ratios (ACWRs), distance traveled, and activity intensity throughout a season for men’s lacrosse players have not been determined. The purpose of our research was to determine if there were positional differences in ACWRs, distance traveled, and activity intensity in men’s NCAA DIII lacrosse players. We recruited 53 NCAA DIII lacrosse players (age=20.4 years, weight=81.6 kg, height=182.4 cm, Attack=12, O-Mid=14, D-Mid=6, FO=4, Goalie=3, Defense=14) from one team for our cross-sectional study. Sport Performance Tracking (SPT, Melbourne, Australia) GPS units tracked athletes’ACWRs (AU), total distance traveled (m), and intensity (proprietary composite score; AU) for every game and practice of the traditional spring lacrosse season (12 weeks). The units used 10 Hz GPS sampling rates which have been found to be both valid and reliable. There was no interaction present between weekly ACWRs and positions (F5,18=.19, P=.96, ��p2=.05), but there was a main effect for time (F3.75,67.57=10.87 P<.001 ��p2=.38). There were significant interactions between session type and positions for total distance traveled (F5,2406=8.09 P=<.001 ��p2=.02) and between-session type and positions for intensity (F5,2406=12.13 P<.001 ��p2=.03). Although ACWRs were similar across positions, they varied across the 9 weeks of the traditional season suggesting varying levels of injury risk. Several positions had significant differences between games for intensity, distance traveled, or both. In all situations, players had higher intensities or total distance traveled in games compared to practices. GPS data can be used to prepare practice plans that reduce injury susceptibility and prepare players for game demands.