Location

Schewel 208

Access Type

Campus Access Only

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

April 2022

Department

Psychology

Abstract

Over the past two years, the SARs-CoV-2 pandemic has resulted in long lasting damage, an increase in mood disorder diagnoses, and an increased spread of misinformation. It was this study’s focus to determine whether exposure to misinformation about Sars-CoV-2 affected anxiety, conspiracy beliefs, and vaccine hesitancy. Participants completed a pre and post-test State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for perceived anxiety measurement alongside the Perceived Stress Scale. Participants were also connected to biofeedback machines for physiological anxiety measurement. Participants completed the Conspiracy Mentality Scale, Conspiracy Belief Scale, Vaccine Conspiracy Belief Scale, and the Vaccine Hesitancy Scale for conspiracy belief measurement. It was hypothesized that exposure to misinformation would result in greater anxiety and greater conspiracy belief and vaccine hesitancy. Data suggests that exposure to misinformation resulted in greater perceived anxiety, and exposure to any Sars-Cov-2 information increased the physiological anxiety response. Results suggest that any information regarding Sars-CoV-2 can be anxiety producing.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Alisha Marciano David Freier Christine Terry

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Apr 6th, 9:00 AM

Effect of Sars-Cov-2 Vaccine Misinformation on Conspiracy Belief and Anxiety

Schewel 208

Over the past two years, the SARs-CoV-2 pandemic has resulted in long lasting damage, an increase in mood disorder diagnoses, and an increased spread of misinformation. It was this study’s focus to determine whether exposure to misinformation about Sars-CoV-2 affected anxiety, conspiracy beliefs, and vaccine hesitancy. Participants completed a pre and post-test State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for perceived anxiety measurement alongside the Perceived Stress Scale. Participants were also connected to biofeedback machines for physiological anxiety measurement. Participants completed the Conspiracy Mentality Scale, Conspiracy Belief Scale, Vaccine Conspiracy Belief Scale, and the Vaccine Hesitancy Scale for conspiracy belief measurement. It was hypothesized that exposure to misinformation would result in greater anxiety and greater conspiracy belief and vaccine hesitancy. Data suggests that exposure to misinformation resulted in greater perceived anxiety, and exposure to any Sars-Cov-2 information increased the physiological anxiety response. Results suggest that any information regarding Sars-CoV-2 can be anxiety producing.