Location

Schewel 215

Access Type

Campus Access Only

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

April 2022

Department

Exercise Physiology

Abstract

Stretching and self-myofascial release through foam rolling has been shown to improve range of motion and have an acute effect on exercise performance. This study was designed to determine how flexible and non flexible adults respond to a lower extremity mobility routine focusing on the hip and ankle joints. After anthropometrics were obtained, subjects’ hip and ankle range of motions, lower body flexibility, countermovement vertical jump and sprint performance were assessed. Based on their pre-test results, subjects were categorized as either flexible or non flexible and randomized into treatment order, with one treatment focusing on hip mobility and the other on ankle mobility. Two sessions were used, one to treat the hip and a second to treat the ankle so the first treatment would not have an effect on the results of the second. Each treatment consisted of 5 minutes of guided foam rolling the specific joint and surrounding muscles before completing a series of stretching exercises. The same measurement outcomes were tested again immediately after completing the treatment. This study hypothesized that the non flexible adults would have a greater response in the measured outcomes, including flexibility and performance, than the flexible adults.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Jill Lucas Dr. DuAnn Kremer Dr. Christine Terry

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Apr 6th, 10:45 AM

The acute response of a lower extremity mobility routine on AROM, sprint time, and vertical jump height in flexible and non flexible adults

Schewel 215

Stretching and self-myofascial release through foam rolling has been shown to improve range of motion and have an acute effect on exercise performance. This study was designed to determine how flexible and non flexible adults respond to a lower extremity mobility routine focusing on the hip and ankle joints. After anthropometrics were obtained, subjects’ hip and ankle range of motions, lower body flexibility, countermovement vertical jump and sprint performance were assessed. Based on their pre-test results, subjects were categorized as either flexible or non flexible and randomized into treatment order, with one treatment focusing on hip mobility and the other on ankle mobility. Two sessions were used, one to treat the hip and a second to treat the ankle so the first treatment would not have an effect on the results of the second. Each treatment consisted of 5 minutes of guided foam rolling the specific joint and surrounding muscles before completing a series of stretching exercises. The same measurement outcomes were tested again immediately after completing the treatment. This study hypothesized that the non flexible adults would have a greater response in the measured outcomes, including flexibility and performance, than the flexible adults.