Location

Schewel 215

Access Type

Campus Access Only

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

April 2022

Department

Exercise Physiology

Abstract

When the global pandemic hit in 2019, many people became concerned about the effects of face masks on the body and on performance during physical exercise; however, research is limited and contradictory. Thus, the purpose of this study is to examine the physiological and perceptual responses to mask use during submaximal exercise. Healthy adults aged 18-55 years completed two randomized conditions (with and without a surgical-grade face mask) of the Queen’s College step test while wearing a portable gas analyzer. A face mask perception survey was administered and prior to each condition, the state-trait anxiety survey was completed. Gas exchange variables, ratings of perceived exertion, and perceived discomfort were collected. The results of this study will give insight to exercise practitioners and participants on the possible scientific impacts of mask use on performance and prescription. Results will also show potential negative feelings towards wearing a face mask and the effect of those feelings on the exercise experience. Holistically, each of these aspects are important to consider for exercise prescription and performance.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Jason Cholewa Nicki Favero Jill Lucas

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Apr 6th, 10:00 AM

Physiological and Perceptual Responses to Mask Use During Submaximal Exercise

Schewel 215

When the global pandemic hit in 2019, many people became concerned about the effects of face masks on the body and on performance during physical exercise; however, research is limited and contradictory. Thus, the purpose of this study is to examine the physiological and perceptual responses to mask use during submaximal exercise. Healthy adults aged 18-55 years completed two randomized conditions (with and without a surgical-grade face mask) of the Queen’s College step test while wearing a portable gas analyzer. A face mask perception survey was administered and prior to each condition, the state-trait anxiety survey was completed. Gas exchange variables, ratings of perceived exertion, and perceived discomfort were collected. The results of this study will give insight to exercise practitioners and participants on the possible scientific impacts of mask use on performance and prescription. Results will also show potential negative feelings towards wearing a face mask and the effect of those feelings on the exercise experience. Holistically, each of these aspects are important to consider for exercise prescription and performance.