Location

Schewel 208

Access Type

Campus Access Only

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

April 2022

Department

Psychology

Abstract

Prior research has shown that listeners may hold a variety of negative attitudes towards individuals with speech or language disorders, such as beliefs that they are lower in intelligence, friendliness, or competence. These studies have suggested that attitudes tend to vary based on the type and severity of the disorder, but results are inconclusive on specific communication characteristics impacting perceptions. The present study measured participants’ attitudes towards an actor portraying either a fluency, articulation, or voice disorder. The between-subjects design involved participants being randomly assigned to listen to one of the three disorder conditions and then completing scales measuring their beliefs about the speaker’s warmth and competence, credibility, intelligence, and desired social distance. A one-way analysis of variance partially supported the hypothesis of a main effect of communication disorder type on personality ratings for the variables of verbal intelligence and social distance. Individuals in the lisp condition gave significantly lower verbal intelligence ratings, and individuals in the hoarseness of voice condition desired significantly more distance from the speaker. Personal contact with an individual with a communication disorder did not have a significant effect on attitude ratings. The results suggest that not all attitude dimensions may be impacted by the presence of communication disorders; however, some negative attitudes do exist towards this population. Implications for potential anti-bias training is discussed, with a focus on the perceptions of verbal intelligence and desired social distance.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Ei Hlaing

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Apr 6th, 9:15 AM

The Effects of Communication Differences on Listeners' Attitudes of Warmth and Competence, Credibility, Intelligence, and Social Distance

Schewel 208

Prior research has shown that listeners may hold a variety of negative attitudes towards individuals with speech or language disorders, such as beliefs that they are lower in intelligence, friendliness, or competence. These studies have suggested that attitudes tend to vary based on the type and severity of the disorder, but results are inconclusive on specific communication characteristics impacting perceptions. The present study measured participants’ attitudes towards an actor portraying either a fluency, articulation, or voice disorder. The between-subjects design involved participants being randomly assigned to listen to one of the three disorder conditions and then completing scales measuring their beliefs about the speaker’s warmth and competence, credibility, intelligence, and desired social distance. A one-way analysis of variance partially supported the hypothesis of a main effect of communication disorder type on personality ratings for the variables of verbal intelligence and social distance. Individuals in the lisp condition gave significantly lower verbal intelligence ratings, and individuals in the hoarseness of voice condition desired significantly more distance from the speaker. Personal contact with an individual with a communication disorder did not have a significant effect on attitude ratings. The results suggest that not all attitude dimensions may be impacted by the presence of communication disorders; however, some negative attitudes do exist towards this population. Implications for potential anti-bias training is discussed, with a focus on the perceptions of verbal intelligence and desired social distance.