Location

Schewel 215

Access Type

Campus Access Only

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

April 2022

Department

Nursing

Abstract

Compassion fatigue is prevalent in all nursing settings, however, it is particularly important to care about it in pediatric nursing because of the unique challenges. Compassion fatigue, made up by burnout and secondary traumatic stress, is a risk to pediatric patients due to the nurse’s inability to care adequately when having overwhelming feelings of exhaustion and mental health disorders and the high prevalence of medical mistakes that can be made. Jean Watson’s Theory of Human Caring was used as a theoretical framework to analyze the sources. This thesis will argue the need for compassion fatigue to be recognized, managed, and interventions necessary to employ to mitigate nursing attrition. Understanding the prevalence of compassion fatigue, the coping mechanisms in place, and the interventions against compassion fatigue provide recommendations on how to stop compassion fatigue in nurses and promote resilience. Current recommendations to reduce compassion fatigue in bedside pediatric nurses may include appropriate debriefings after traumatic shifts, having management review and create interventions for the stressors of care, appropriate time off from work, education in orientation, an annual program to educate, and collaboration with the whole unit to help protect against negative feelings of compassion fatigue.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Professor Kristin Shargots ’16 MSN, RN, CCRN, CNE Dr. Lisa Jamerson, DNP, MSN, RN, NRP Dr. Laura Kicklighter, PhD

Rights Statement

The right to download or print any portion of this material is granted by the copyright owner only for personal or educational use. The author/creator retains all proprietary rights, including copyright ownership. Any editing, other reproduction or other use of this material by any means requires the express written permission of the copyright owner. Except as provided above, or for any other use that is allowed by fair use (Title 17, §107 U.S.C.), you may not reproduce, republish, post, transmit or distribute any material from this web site in any physical or digital form without the permission of the copyright owner of the material.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 6th, 3:45 PM

When Helping Becomes Hurting: Compassion Fatigue in Pediatric Nurses

Schewel 215

Compassion fatigue is prevalent in all nursing settings, however, it is particularly important to care about it in pediatric nursing because of the unique challenges. Compassion fatigue, made up by burnout and secondary traumatic stress, is a risk to pediatric patients due to the nurse’s inability to care adequately when having overwhelming feelings of exhaustion and mental health disorders and the high prevalence of medical mistakes that can be made. Jean Watson’s Theory of Human Caring was used as a theoretical framework to analyze the sources. This thesis will argue the need for compassion fatigue to be recognized, managed, and interventions necessary to employ to mitigate nursing attrition. Understanding the prevalence of compassion fatigue, the coping mechanisms in place, and the interventions against compassion fatigue provide recommendations on how to stop compassion fatigue in nurses and promote resilience. Current recommendations to reduce compassion fatigue in bedside pediatric nurses may include appropriate debriefings after traumatic shifts, having management review and create interventions for the stressors of care, appropriate time off from work, education in orientation, an annual program to educate, and collaboration with the whole unit to help protect against negative feelings of compassion fatigue.