Oral Presentations

Poster or Presentation Title

Race and Gender in the Stigmatization of Mental Illness

Location

Schewel 208

Access Type

Campus Access Only

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

6-4-2022 11:15 AM

End Date

6-4-2022 11:30 AM

Department

Psychology

Abstract

Previous studies have shown that men and minorities are more likely to experience stigma for having mental illnesses (Dupont-Reyes et al., 2020). This study was conducted to determine whether there was an impact of race and gender on internal and external mental illness stigma. The participants were 179 undergraduate students at a college that is majority white and female. It was hypothesized that men and minorities would experience more internal and external stigma than women and Caucasians. The hypotheses were tested by having participants read a vignette of a mentally ill person whose race and gender were manipulated, and then complete measures on general external stigma, workplace stigma, and internalized stigma. A 2x3 Factorial ANOVA showed that men are more likely to experience external stigma in the workplace, whereas women are more likely to experience general external stigma, and report experiencing internal stigma. This external stigma imposed on mentally ill men and women can be damaging, and may contribute to internalized stigma.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Alisha Marciano

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Apr 6th, 11:15 AM Apr 6th, 11:30 AM

Race and Gender in the Stigmatization of Mental Illness

Schewel 208

Previous studies have shown that men and minorities are more likely to experience stigma for having mental illnesses (Dupont-Reyes et al., 2020). This study was conducted to determine whether there was an impact of race and gender on internal and external mental illness stigma. The participants were 179 undergraduate students at a college that is majority white and female. It was hypothesized that men and minorities would experience more internal and external stigma than women and Caucasians. The hypotheses were tested by having participants read a vignette of a mentally ill person whose race and gender were manipulated, and then complete measures on general external stigma, workplace stigma, and internalized stigma. A 2x3 Factorial ANOVA showed that men are more likely to experience external stigma in the workplace, whereas women are more likely to experience general external stigma, and report experiencing internal stigma. This external stigma imposed on mentally ill men and women can be damaging, and may contribute to internalized stigma.