Oral Presentations

Poster or Presentation Title

The Philosophy of Music According to Medieval Theorist Boethius: Interpreting The Fundamentals of Music

Student Author Information

Monica C. Chisom, University of Lynchburg

Location

Sydnor Auditorium

Access Type

Campus Access Only

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

6-4-2022 1:45 PM

End Date

6-4-2022 2:00 PM

Department

Music

Abstract

Anicius Manlius Severinus Boethius’ (c. 480-524) De Institutione Musica no longer represents the music philosophies of today. With the intent of improving music pedagogy and performance, the purpose of this research was to investigate Boethius’ philosophy of music in Ancient Greece. The particular problems of this study were to: (1) examine the life of Medieval theorist Anicius Manlius Severinus Boethius; (2) provide a synopsis of De Institutione Musica (The Fundamentals of Music); and (3) analyze Book I of De Institutione Musica (The Fundamentals of Music).

Boethius, a medieval theorist and philosopher born around 480, wrote treatises on various topics such as arithmetic, geometry astronomy, religion, philosophy, and music. The Fundamentals of Music, comprised of five Books with around thirty chapters per book, covers topics of musical theory in a mathematical approach. The treatise on music became used as the music theory textbook for centuries. In Book I, Boethius wrote about the ratios of the octave, perfect fifth, and perfect fourth, the divisions of music, definitions for sound and consonance, and the classes of musicians. Ancient musical treatises written in Latin and Boethius’ impact of music education through the quadrivium brought the interest for this research. In order to combine with the history of music, the study of Boethius and De Institutione Musica (The Fundamentals of Music) led to the tracing of the classes of musicians through the Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, and Classical periods.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Cynthia Ramsey

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Apr 6th, 1:45 PM Apr 6th, 2:00 PM

The Philosophy of Music According to Medieval Theorist Boethius: Interpreting The Fundamentals of Music

Sydnor Auditorium

Anicius Manlius Severinus Boethius’ (c. 480-524) De Institutione Musica no longer represents the music philosophies of today. With the intent of improving music pedagogy and performance, the purpose of this research was to investigate Boethius’ philosophy of music in Ancient Greece. The particular problems of this study were to: (1) examine the life of Medieval theorist Anicius Manlius Severinus Boethius; (2) provide a synopsis of De Institutione Musica (The Fundamentals of Music); and (3) analyze Book I of De Institutione Musica (The Fundamentals of Music).

Boethius, a medieval theorist and philosopher born around 480, wrote treatises on various topics such as arithmetic, geometry astronomy, religion, philosophy, and music. The Fundamentals of Music, comprised of five Books with around thirty chapters per book, covers topics of musical theory in a mathematical approach. The treatise on music became used as the music theory textbook for centuries. In Book I, Boethius wrote about the ratios of the octave, perfect fifth, and perfect fourth, the divisions of music, definitions for sound and consonance, and the classes of musicians. Ancient musical treatises written in Latin and Boethius’ impact of music education through the quadrivium brought the interest for this research. In order to combine with the history of music, the study of Boethius and De Institutione Musica (The Fundamentals of Music) led to the tracing of the classes of musicians through the Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, and Classical periods.