Poster or Presentation Title

READ [RED] Not DEAD: A Reading of Arden of Faversham

Location

Memorial Ballroom, Hall Campus Center

Access Type

Campus Access Only

Entry Number

150

Start Date

4-5-2023 4:00 PM

End Date

4-5-2023 6:00 PM

College

Lynchburg College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Theatre Arts

Abstract

The READ Not DEAD concept was created in 1995 by Patrick Spottiswoode as Director of Globe Education at Shakespeare’s Globe in London to revive “forgotten plays.” Staged by professional actors, these performances are presented with scripts in hand and are about bringing to life plays and authors that were popular in the past but would otherwise not reach modern audiences.

Other venues have imitated the READ Not DEAD format, and we will put our spin on it as well, with our RED Not DEAD reading of Arden of Faversham, a play that is seldom staged in the UK and almost never in the US. This group reading, by students and faculty, will offer students an opportunity to hear aloud a play rich with dark hilarity and (unfortunately) still-resonant themes.

While we will have two rehearsals, most of the excitement of the project will be the relatively spontaneous decisions readers will have to make about their characters, as well as reactions that audience members will have as they watch, and the way in which those reactions might/will interact with and have an impact upon the performance as a whole. In other words, while we're going to rehearse, the real magic, even more so than when a play is thoroughly rehearsed, takes place once the audience enters the equation. So the performance is both a showcase, something relatively prepared and presented, but also very much an experiment, the results of which can't be entirely known or anticipated until the day. Everyone, actors and audience, will be actively engaged in and watching research happen!

We will have a short Q&A + discussion period after the reading.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Robin Bates
Dr. Elizabeth Sharrett

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Apr 5th, 4:00 PM Apr 5th, 6:00 PM

READ [RED] Not DEAD: A Reading of Arden of Faversham

Memorial Ballroom, Hall Campus Center

The READ Not DEAD concept was created in 1995 by Patrick Spottiswoode as Director of Globe Education at Shakespeare’s Globe in London to revive “forgotten plays.” Staged by professional actors, these performances are presented with scripts in hand and are about bringing to life plays and authors that were popular in the past but would otherwise not reach modern audiences.

Other venues have imitated the READ Not DEAD format, and we will put our spin on it as well, with our RED Not DEAD reading of Arden of Faversham, a play that is seldom staged in the UK and almost never in the US. This group reading, by students and faculty, will offer students an opportunity to hear aloud a play rich with dark hilarity and (unfortunately) still-resonant themes.

While we will have two rehearsals, most of the excitement of the project will be the relatively spontaneous decisions readers will have to make about their characters, as well as reactions that audience members will have as they watch, and the way in which those reactions might/will interact with and have an impact upon the performance as a whole. In other words, while we're going to rehearse, the real magic, even more so than when a play is thoroughly rehearsed, takes place once the audience enters the equation. So the performance is both a showcase, something relatively prepared and presented, but also very much an experiment, the results of which can't be entirely known or anticipated until the day. Everyone, actors and audience, will be actively engaged in and watching research happen!

We will have a short Q&A + discussion period after the reading.