Location

Memorial Ballroom

Access Type

Event

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Event Website

http://www.lynchburg.edu/academics/red-letter-day/student-scholar-showcase/

Start Date

6-4-2016 12:00 PM

End Date

6-4-2016 1:00 PM

Abstract

Silicon is the most widely used semiconductor material in solar panels, due to its relatively high efficiency to cost ratio. Of the many varieties of semiconductors, monocrystalline and polycrystalline silicon are two of the predominant solar cell structures. As light hits these semiconductor panels, electrons are excited from the valance band to the conduction band allowing current to flow through them. Adding impurities to a silicon semiconductor, a process known as doping, can create either a p-type semiconductor with excess holes (vacant spaces with +1e charge) or an n-type semiconductor with excess electrons. Combining p-type and n-type semiconductors forms a P-N junction which allows us to control and direct the flow of elections into a useable current. In my experiment, I measured the output voltages of a monocrystalline and a polycrystalline solar panel in order to compare their efficiencies. A better understanding of solar panel efficiencies allows us to improve on existing technology and it allows those interested in solar array installations to find the most productive and cost effective product for their needs.

Faculty Mentor

Dr. William M. Roach

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Apr 6th, 12:00 PM Apr 6th, 1:00 PM

Monocrystalline and Polycrystalline Silicon Semiconductors in Solar Cells

Memorial Ballroom

Silicon is the most widely used semiconductor material in solar panels, due to its relatively high efficiency to cost ratio. Of the many varieties of semiconductors, monocrystalline and polycrystalline silicon are two of the predominant solar cell structures. As light hits these semiconductor panels, electrons are excited from the valance band to the conduction band allowing current to flow through them. Adding impurities to a silicon semiconductor, a process known as doping, can create either a p-type semiconductor with excess holes (vacant spaces with +1e charge) or an n-type semiconductor with excess electrons. Combining p-type and n-type semiconductors forms a P-N junction which allows us to control and direct the flow of elections into a useable current. In my experiment, I measured the output voltages of a monocrystalline and a polycrystalline solar panel in order to compare their efficiencies. A better understanding of solar panel efficiencies allows us to improve on existing technology and it allows those interested in solar array installations to find the most productive and cost effective product for their needs.

https://digitalshowcase.lynchburg.edu/studentshowcase/2016/Posters/9