Poster or Presentation Title

Comparing Racial Attitudes Between Black and White Males

Location

Hall Memorial Ballroom

Access Type

Open Access

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Start Date

4-4-2018 12:00 PM

Department

Psychology

Abstract

This study examined attitudes about race by asking participants questions about a fictitious male who was either white or black. Participants sampled from a small liberal arts college were asked to read a brief vignette that described a male; the vignette was identical for experimental and control participants except that the male was either black or white. Participants were also asked demographic questions, which indicated that most were white students. We hypothesized that negative racial stereotypes would occur when the fictitious male, named “Jacob,” was black even though the vignette was identical for both racial versions of him.

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Keith Corodimas

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Apr 4th, 12:00 PM

Comparing Racial Attitudes Between Black and White Males

Hall Memorial Ballroom

This study examined attitudes about race by asking participants questions about a fictitious male who was either white or black. Participants sampled from a small liberal arts college were asked to read a brief vignette that described a male; the vignette was identical for experimental and control participants except that the male was either black or white. Participants were also asked demographic questions, which indicated that most were white students. We hypothesized that negative racial stereotypes would occur when the fictitious male, named “Jacob,” was black even though the vignette was identical for both racial versions of him.