Poster or Presentation Title

Feeding Biomechanics of Raptors: Evolutionary Perspectives

Presenter Information

Matthew KoelbelFollow

Location

Hall Memorial Ballroom

Access Type

Campus Access Only

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Start Date

4-4-2018 12:00 PM

Department

Biology

Abstract

The Ostrom’s hypotheses regarding avian evolution state that aves (modern birds) is a derived group of theropod dinosaurs characterized by adaptations for endothermy, feathers, and flight. In vertebrates, the force production via the musculoskeletal system is influenced by several mechanical and physiological factors. During feeding, the force exerted at the teeth for biting can be calculated as a product of the mechanical advantage of the jaw and input force from the jaw adductor muscles for jaw closure. Using replicas of a fossil skull of Velociraptor mongoliensis (Dromaeosauridae) as a representative theropod dinosaur, Archaeopteryx lithographica as a representative of the earliest and most primitive birds, which shares many theropod features and is recognized as a transitional dinosaur-bird specimen, and a sharp-shinned hawk (Accipiter striatusa) as a representative of modern raptors, we evaluated how functional morphology of the jaw and jaw adductor muscles in these animals would contribute to their bite force production. We discuss the implication of our experimental results with respect to characterizing theropod functional morphology and feeding biomechanics. In addition, this study provides insight into the evolutionary transition of toothed-jaws to keratinized and toothless-jaws.

Faculty Mentor

Takashi Maie

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Apr 4th, 12:00 PM

Feeding Biomechanics of Raptors: Evolutionary Perspectives

Hall Memorial Ballroom

The Ostrom’s hypotheses regarding avian evolution state that aves (modern birds) is a derived group of theropod dinosaurs characterized by adaptations for endothermy, feathers, and flight. In vertebrates, the force production via the musculoskeletal system is influenced by several mechanical and physiological factors. During feeding, the force exerted at the teeth for biting can be calculated as a product of the mechanical advantage of the jaw and input force from the jaw adductor muscles for jaw closure. Using replicas of a fossil skull of Velociraptor mongoliensis (Dromaeosauridae) as a representative theropod dinosaur, Archaeopteryx lithographica as a representative of the earliest and most primitive birds, which shares many theropod features and is recognized as a transitional dinosaur-bird specimen, and a sharp-shinned hawk (Accipiter striatusa) as a representative of modern raptors, we evaluated how functional morphology of the jaw and jaw adductor muscles in these animals would contribute to their bite force production. We discuss the implication of our experimental results with respect to characterizing theropod functional morphology and feeding biomechanics. In addition, this study provides insight into the evolutionary transition of toothed-jaws to keratinized and toothless-jaws.