Presenter Information

Gina RomanoFollow

Location

Schewel 232

Access Type

Campus Access Only

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

4-4-2018 4:00 PM

Department

Psychology

Abstract

Building on the research of Abrams, Viki, Masser & Bohner, (2003) Ryan & Kanjorski, (1998), and Thomae & Viki, (2013, this study examines the role humor plays on the acceptance of rape myths in college students. This study seeks to determine if the type of joke (sexist, feminist or neutral) and the reception method (reading or listening) has an impact on how much an individual accepts rape myths. Participants either read or listened to five jokes from one of three joke categories: sexist, feminist, or neutral. The participants then answered questions regarding joke hilarity and took a rape myth acceptance measure.The results of this study are expected to show that individuals who were exposed to sexist jokes to have higher rape myth acceptance than those exposed to feminist and neutral jokes. The implications of this study were to increase the awareness of how jokes may affect people’s attitudes about rape and sexual assault.

Faculty Mentor

Alishia Marciano, Laura Kicklighter, Virginia Cylke

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Apr 4th, 4:00 PM

That’s Not Funny: The Effect of Exposure to Sexist or Feminist Humor on Rape Myth Acceptance

Schewel 232

Building on the research of Abrams, Viki, Masser & Bohner, (2003) Ryan & Kanjorski, (1998), and Thomae & Viki, (2013, this study examines the role humor plays on the acceptance of rape myths in college students. This study seeks to determine if the type of joke (sexist, feminist or neutral) and the reception method (reading or listening) has an impact on how much an individual accepts rape myths. Participants either read or listened to five jokes from one of three joke categories: sexist, feminist, or neutral. The participants then answered questions regarding joke hilarity and took a rape myth acceptance measure.The results of this study are expected to show that individuals who were exposed to sexist jokes to have higher rape myth acceptance than those exposed to feminist and neutral jokes. The implications of this study were to increase the awareness of how jokes may affect people’s attitudes about rape and sexual assault.