Presenter Information

CarolAnne BekusFollow

Location

Schewel 232

Access Type

Open Access

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

4-4-2018 10:30 AM

Department

Biology

Abstract

The completion of sequencing Arabidopsis thaliana’s genome has led to the next crucial challenge of determining gene function in these plants. A. thaliana is a model organism often compared to commercial crops. The discovery of gene function within these plants will aid in giving insight on how gene function can affect commercial crop production. Presented here is an analysis comparing wild-type Columbia (Col-O), to single gene mutants when knocking-out transcriptional factors VPI/ABI3-like 1 (val1) and basic region/leucine zipper motif (bZIP). These single gene mutations may affect several traits that in turn can result in morphological changes and/or time of development. Wild-type and mutants were grown side by side measuring the time of bolt and reproductive parts under both similar conditions and conditions of varying light intensity. Val1 and bZIP mutants indicated extended developmental time through a prolonged time of bolt as compared to wild-type plants. Under different light intensity ranges (62-96 PPF, 107-130 PPF, and 117-143 PPF) there remained to be significant difference in the developmental growth of each plant including bolting time. The production of reproductive parts was less within mutants as well compared to wild-type, resulting in lower amounts of siliques and flowers after five weeks suggesting that maturation and overall growth is stunted or prolonged when suppressing genes such as val1 and bZIP in A. thaliana. This is an indication that these genes play a role the short-life cycle that this model organism is known for.

Faculty Mentor

Erin Friedmen

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Apr 4th, 10:30 AM

Evaluating Effects of Gene Mutation and Light Intensity on Arabidopsis thaliana Development

Schewel 232

The completion of sequencing Arabidopsis thaliana’s genome has led to the next crucial challenge of determining gene function in these plants. A. thaliana is a model organism often compared to commercial crops. The discovery of gene function within these plants will aid in giving insight on how gene function can affect commercial crop production. Presented here is an analysis comparing wild-type Columbia (Col-O), to single gene mutants when knocking-out transcriptional factors VPI/ABI3-like 1 (val1) and basic region/leucine zipper motif (bZIP). These single gene mutations may affect several traits that in turn can result in morphological changes and/or time of development. Wild-type and mutants were grown side by side measuring the time of bolt and reproductive parts under both similar conditions and conditions of varying light intensity. Val1 and bZIP mutants indicated extended developmental time through a prolonged time of bolt as compared to wild-type plants. Under different light intensity ranges (62-96 PPF, 107-130 PPF, and 117-143 PPF) there remained to be significant difference in the developmental growth of each plant including bolting time. The production of reproductive parts was less within mutants as well compared to wild-type, resulting in lower amounts of siliques and flowers after five weeks suggesting that maturation and overall growth is stunted or prolonged when suppressing genes such as val1 and bZIP in A. thaliana. This is an indication that these genes play a role the short-life cycle that this model organism is known for.