Archived Abstracts

Poster or Presentation Title

Emergency Medical Technicians' Beliefs and Knowledge on Impact Related Concussions and Athletic Trainers' Duties

Location

Memorial Ballroom, Hall Campus Center

Access Type

Open Access

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Start Date

8-4-2020 12:00 PM

End Date

8-4-2020 1:15 PM

Department

Athletic Training

Abstract

Our purpose was to determine confidence levels of emergency medical technicians (EMTs) in recognition and treatment of sports-related concussions (SRCs) and their opinions towards athletic trainers (ATs).

This study was an online survey of EMTs including true or false, Likert scale, and open-ended questions. Likert scale questions were compared across training levels using a Kruskal-Wallis test. The open-ended questions were analyzed using an inductive approach and credibility was maintained using multiple analyst triangulation and peer review.

Likert scale data revealed mixed perceptions and confidence in SRC care. There was no significant difference between training levels and responses to Likert scale questions (p>0.05). Themes that emerged from the qualitative data include that EMTs 1) understand the AT profession in that EMTs know typical AT roles and responsibilities but have 2) inaccurate perceptions of ATs in the areas of educational background, emergency care, and knowledge of non-sports related injuries. We also found that EMTs view themselves as having 3) typical roles and responsibilities on sidelines such as emergency care and transportation.

EMTs are not confident in their ability to identify and care for SRCs. EMTs generally understand the athletic training profession, but additional efforts are needed to improve full understanding.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Tom Bowman
Dr. Debbie Bradney
Dr. Emily Evans

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Apr 8th, 12:00 PM Apr 8th, 1:15 PM

Emergency Medical Technicians' Beliefs and Knowledge on Impact Related Concussions and Athletic Trainers' Duties

Memorial Ballroom, Hall Campus Center

Our purpose was to determine confidence levels of emergency medical technicians (EMTs) in recognition and treatment of sports-related concussions (SRCs) and their opinions towards athletic trainers (ATs).

This study was an online survey of EMTs including true or false, Likert scale, and open-ended questions. Likert scale questions were compared across training levels using a Kruskal-Wallis test. The open-ended questions were analyzed using an inductive approach and credibility was maintained using multiple analyst triangulation and peer review.

Likert scale data revealed mixed perceptions and confidence in SRC care. There was no significant difference between training levels and responses to Likert scale questions (p>0.05). Themes that emerged from the qualitative data include that EMTs 1) understand the AT profession in that EMTs know typical AT roles and responsibilities but have 2) inaccurate perceptions of ATs in the areas of educational background, emergency care, and knowledge of non-sports related injuries. We also found that EMTs view themselves as having 3) typical roles and responsibilities on sidelines such as emergency care and transportation.

EMTs are not confident in their ability to identify and care for SRCs. EMTs generally understand the athletic training profession, but additional efforts are needed to improve full understanding.