Archived Abstracts

Poster or Presentation Title

The Acute Effects of Blood Flow Restriction During Exercise

Location

Sydnor Performance Hall, Schewel Hall

Access Type

Campus Access Only

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

8-4-2020 11:30 AM

End Date

8-4-2020 11:45 AM

Department

Exercise Physiology

Abstract

Background: Blood flow restriction (BFR) involves the use of a tourniquet style pneumatic cuff tightened around the proximal aspect of a limb. The pressure applied by the cuff results in the restriction of venous return out of the limb resulting in an increase in venous pooling in the working muscle; creating an anaerobic cellular environment, similar to that of heavy load resistance training. Previous literature has explored the effects of BFR on muscle hypertrophy, overall muscular strength gains, ideal cuff width, arterial occlusion pressure (AOP), and set - repetition scheme, but has failed to investigate the acute physiological response during exercise. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the immediate physiological response and the perceived effects that are elicited when performing low-intensity exercise in conjunction with BFR compared to the physiological response that occurs as a result of heavy load non-BFR exercise.

Methods: Subjects completed seated, incline leg press over three experimental trials. Two were BFR trials {BFR-60 [restriction set to 60% AOP] and BFR-10 [10% AOP]} with a resistance load equal to 20% of one-repetition maximum resistance (1RM), and one non-BFR trial at 65% 1RM (HL). Measurements recorded were heart rate, rate of perceived exertion, pain perception, and blood lactate.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Sean Collins
Dr. Tom Bowman
Dr. Jennifer Styrsky
Dr. Jill Lucas

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Apr 8th, 11:30 AM Apr 8th, 11:45 AM

The Acute Effects of Blood Flow Restriction During Exercise

Sydnor Performance Hall, Schewel Hall

Background: Blood flow restriction (BFR) involves the use of a tourniquet style pneumatic cuff tightened around the proximal aspect of a limb. The pressure applied by the cuff results in the restriction of venous return out of the limb resulting in an increase in venous pooling in the working muscle; creating an anaerobic cellular environment, similar to that of heavy load resistance training. Previous literature has explored the effects of BFR on muscle hypertrophy, overall muscular strength gains, ideal cuff width, arterial occlusion pressure (AOP), and set - repetition scheme, but has failed to investigate the acute physiological response during exercise. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the immediate physiological response and the perceived effects that are elicited when performing low-intensity exercise in conjunction with BFR compared to the physiological response that occurs as a result of heavy load non-BFR exercise.

Methods: Subjects completed seated, incline leg press over three experimental trials. Two were BFR trials {BFR-60 [restriction set to 60% AOP] and BFR-10 [10% AOP]} with a resistance load equal to 20% of one-repetition maximum resistance (1RM), and one non-BFR trial at 65% 1RM (HL). Measurements recorded were heart rate, rate of perceived exertion, pain perception, and blood lactate.