Poster or Presentation Title

Generational Trauma and Nationalist Rhetoric as a Basis for Genocide

Student Author Information

Ethan Walton, University of LynchburgFollow

Location

Virtual | Room 1

Access Type

Open Access

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

7-4-2021 2:15 PM

End Date

7-4-2021 2:30 PM

Department

Political Science

Abstract

The atrocities that were committed in Rwanda, Bosnia and Armenia could not have been possible without the participation or support of those populations. How is it possible that humans can be convinced to carry out unimaginable atrocities against fellow men and women, many of whom they called friends and neighbors? I will be using the three instances of genocide mentioned above as my case studies to test my hypothesis and determine how trauma and rhetoric led to each genocide.

My thesis will approach this question through studying governments, human behavior, pre-existing conditions, historical trauma, and violent rhetoric to attempt to draw parallels and pinpoint exactly which factors are universal precursors and contributors to genocide. These three cases of genocide provide a diverse range of geographic locations, ethnicities, religions, and socio-economic categories in order to show that genocides are not dependent on these factors and have similar underpinnings despite the variations of the factors above. I will be analyzing how genocide can be perpetuated as the perception of certain groups is changed by rhetoric to dehumanize or have them be considered a threat to the fabric of society. Genocide is more than murder, it is the desire to exterminate an entire people, their culture, their history, and their ability to reproduce and survive. This should never be taken lightly, but our modern globalized world has done little to prevent the continuation of genocides. This must change if we are to have any hope of preventing future brutalities.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Timothy Meinke
Dr. Lorna Dawson
Dr. Brian Crim
Dr. Nichole Sanders

Rights Statement

The right to download or print any portion of this material is granted by the copyright owner only for personal or educational use. The author/creator retains all proprietary rights, including copyright ownership. Any editing, other reproduction or other use of this material by any means requires the express written permission of the copyright owner. Except as provided above, or for any other use that is allowed by fair use (Title 17, §107 U.S.C.), you may not reproduce, republish, post, transmit or distribute any material from this web site in any physical or digital form without the permission of the copyright owner of the material.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 7th, 2:15 PM Apr 7th, 2:30 PM

Generational Trauma and Nationalist Rhetoric as a Basis for Genocide

Virtual | Room 1

The atrocities that were committed in Rwanda, Bosnia and Armenia could not have been possible without the participation or support of those populations. How is it possible that humans can be convinced to carry out unimaginable atrocities against fellow men and women, many of whom they called friends and neighbors? I will be using the three instances of genocide mentioned above as my case studies to test my hypothesis and determine how trauma and rhetoric led to each genocide.

My thesis will approach this question through studying governments, human behavior, pre-existing conditions, historical trauma, and violent rhetoric to attempt to draw parallels and pinpoint exactly which factors are universal precursors and contributors to genocide. These three cases of genocide provide a diverse range of geographic locations, ethnicities, religions, and socio-economic categories in order to show that genocides are not dependent on these factors and have similar underpinnings despite the variations of the factors above. I will be analyzing how genocide can be perpetuated as the perception of certain groups is changed by rhetoric to dehumanize or have them be considered a threat to the fabric of society. Genocide is more than murder, it is the desire to exterminate an entire people, their culture, their history, and their ability to reproduce and survive. This should never be taken lightly, but our modern globalized world has done little to prevent the continuation of genocides. This must change if we are to have any hope of preventing future brutalities.