Access Type

Campus Access Only

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Department

Athletic Training

Abstract

Context: There is limited research regarding the mental health of Division III intercollegiate athletes' utilization of services on-campus and what prevents athletes from seeking mental health services. Intercollegiate athletes undergo both academic and athletic stressors daily, therefore utilizing the services provided by the campus/athletic department can be essential for educating the athletes on how to cope and manage any concerns.

Objective: To identify stigma and reasoning from intercollegiate athletes regarding mental health services on campus and why they are/are not being utilized.

Design: Quantitative

Setting: Online electronic survey

Patients or Other Participants: 15 participants from 6 Old Dominion Athletic Conference (ODAC) schools.

Main Outcome Measure(s): Mental health stigma measured with Self-Stigma of Seeking Help Scale (SSOSH). The extent of and perceived contributors to mental stress and efficacy of mental health resources were also measured.

Results: Sixty percent of respondents indicated that there was a time in which they wanted to seek services for their mental health, but chose not to. Respondents identified informal drop-in supports groups, a designated healthcare professional within the athletic department who promotes student-athlete mental health, and education on athlete mental health for coaches as beneficial resources. There is a slight self-stigma surrounding seeking help for ODAC student-athletes.

Conclusions: Administrators, athletic department staff, and mental health services on campus can implement these responses into their resources and or services provided on campus. Findings from this study can inform the ODAC and assist in mental health service planning for student-athletes.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Debbie Bradney Brittany Smith Dominique Favero

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Perceptions of Mental Health Stigma and Mental Health Services in Division III Student-Athletes

Context: There is limited research regarding the mental health of Division III intercollegiate athletes' utilization of services on-campus and what prevents athletes from seeking mental health services. Intercollegiate athletes undergo both academic and athletic stressors daily, therefore utilizing the services provided by the campus/athletic department can be essential for educating the athletes on how to cope and manage any concerns.

Objective: To identify stigma and reasoning from intercollegiate athletes regarding mental health services on campus and why they are/are not being utilized.

Design: Quantitative

Setting: Online electronic survey

Patients or Other Participants: 15 participants from 6 Old Dominion Athletic Conference (ODAC) schools.

Main Outcome Measure(s): Mental health stigma measured with Self-Stigma of Seeking Help Scale (SSOSH). The extent of and perceived contributors to mental stress and efficacy of mental health resources were also measured.

Results: Sixty percent of respondents indicated that there was a time in which they wanted to seek services for their mental health, but chose not to. Respondents identified informal drop-in supports groups, a designated healthcare professional within the athletic department who promotes student-athlete mental health, and education on athlete mental health for coaches as beneficial resources. There is a slight self-stigma surrounding seeking help for ODAC student-athletes.

Conclusions: Administrators, athletic department staff, and mental health services on campus can implement these responses into their resources and or services provided on campus. Findings from this study can inform the ODAC and assist in mental health service planning for student-athletes.