Student Author Information

Sam Gunter, University of LynchburgFollow

Location

Schewel 215

Access Type

Open Access

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

April 2022

Department

Exercise Physiology

Abstract

Competitive distance runners are often predisposed to developing iron deficiency. This study aimed to determine if carbonyl iron was more effective at maintaining blood iron markers and minimizing overall fatigue and GI stress than ferrous sulfate. In this randomized, independent groups study, 7 male, division III cross-country athletes were supplemented with either carbonyl iron or ferrous sulfate for 6 weeks. Blood hemoglobin, hematocrit, subjective GI distress, subjective fatigue, and relative exertion of recent training were assessed at baseline, 3 and 6 weeks. Results will be analyzed via a detailed analysis of variance to determine significant differences in outcome measures. Statistical analysis will be implemented to determine levels of significance between these outcome measures.

Key Words: Distance runners, iron, iron deficiency, carbonyl iron, ferrous sulfate, fatigue, blood, athletes

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Jill Lucas, Dr. Jeffery Herrick, Dr. Christine Terry

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Apr 6th, 11:00 AM

Carbonyl Iron vs Ferrous Sulfate on Blood Iron Markers in Male Division III Cross-Country Athletes

Schewel 215

Competitive distance runners are often predisposed to developing iron deficiency. This study aimed to determine if carbonyl iron was more effective at maintaining blood iron markers and minimizing overall fatigue and GI stress than ferrous sulfate. In this randomized, independent groups study, 7 male, division III cross-country athletes were supplemented with either carbonyl iron or ferrous sulfate for 6 weeks. Blood hemoglobin, hematocrit, subjective GI distress, subjective fatigue, and relative exertion of recent training were assessed at baseline, 3 and 6 weeks. Results will be analyzed via a detailed analysis of variance to determine significant differences in outcome measures. Statistical analysis will be implemented to determine levels of significance between these outcome measures.

Key Words: Distance runners, iron, iron deficiency, carbonyl iron, ferrous sulfate, fatigue, blood, athletes