Student Author Information

Lillian SmithFollow

Location

Schewel 208

Access Type

Open Access

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Start Date

April 2022

Department

Environmental Science

Abstract

Transportation of trash debris within water systems is a prominent occurrence which has been linked to natural and artificial processes such as wind, rain, and littering. Recreational areas, such as activities along greenway trails, have been determined to be a source of debris found in waterways. This study examines whether the presence of an established recreational trail system limits trash accumulation in the entirety of a watershed. Trash data collected at Blackwater Creek, which contains an established trail system, was compared to trash data collected at Fishing Creek, containing a non-established trail system, to answer this hypothesis. A distance of 100 yards upstream and downstream of three locations along each of the creek’s trail systems was walked to collect trash debris. Results from this research are to be used to assist the City of Lynchburg in the Tyreeanna & Pleasant Valley Neighborhood Plan development.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. David Perault Dr. Jennifer Styrsky Dr. Priscilla Gannicott

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Apr 6th, 1:15 PM

Mapping the Impact of A Trailway System on the Amount of Trash Present Within Two Watersheds of Lynchburg City, Virginia

Schewel 208

Transportation of trash debris within water systems is a prominent occurrence which has been linked to natural and artificial processes such as wind, rain, and littering. Recreational areas, such as activities along greenway trails, have been determined to be a source of debris found in waterways. This study examines whether the presence of an established recreational trail system limits trash accumulation in the entirety of a watershed. Trash data collected at Blackwater Creek, which contains an established trail system, was compared to trash data collected at Fishing Creek, containing a non-established trail system, to answer this hypothesis. A distance of 100 yards upstream and downstream of three locations along each of the creek’s trail systems was walked to collect trash debris. Results from this research are to be used to assist the City of Lynchburg in the Tyreeanna & Pleasant Valley Neighborhood Plan development.