Ethylene-Forming Enzyme Kinetics and Ethylene Biosynthesis

Location

Room 232, Schewel Hall

Access Type

Campus Access Only

Start Date

4-17-2024 8:45 AM

End Date

4-17-2024 9:00 AM

College

Lynchburg College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Biomedical Science

Keywords

ethylene, biosynthesis, EFE, kinetics, recombinant, HPLC

Abstract

Ethylene is the organic compound that serves as the raw material for polyethylene and other chemical polymers used in plastics manufacturing. Traditional methods used to obtain ethylene are associated with significant carbon emissions that are harmful to the environment. Despite these negative environmental impacts, the utility of ethylene in commercial and medical industries has led researchers to investigate potential pathways for ethylene biosynthesis in recent decades. Previous studies have identified an ethylene-forming enzyme (EFE) that is involved in ethylene biosynthesis in microorganisms. Researchers have explored biochemical properties of EFE and strategies for maximizing enzyme expression and ethylene yield in recombinant organisms expressing the efe gene; however, it remains unclear whether ethylene biosynthesis involving EFE can produce the high ethylene yields necessary for commercial and medical use.

Research conducted in this project investigated ethylene biosynthesis as a potential alternative to conventional methods used to obtain ethylene. Experiments were conducted to analyze the structure and kinetic properties of EFE from Pseudomonas syringae. Preliminary research focused on enzyme isolation and purification from recombinant Escherichia coli engineered to express the efe gene. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was then used to analyze the kinetic properties of EFE and indirectly measure EFE ethylene production. Virtual reality technology was also used to explore the structure of EFE. The research results provide additional data necessary to evaluate the potential of ethylene biosynthesis via EFE to serve as an alternative method to obtain ethylene.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Jamie Brooks Dr. Samrat Thapa Dr. Jason Crumpton Dr. Price Blair

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Apr 17th, 8:45 AM Apr 17th, 9:00 AM

Ethylene-Forming Enzyme Kinetics and Ethylene Biosynthesis

Room 232, Schewel Hall

Ethylene is the organic compound that serves as the raw material for polyethylene and other chemical polymers used in plastics manufacturing. Traditional methods used to obtain ethylene are associated with significant carbon emissions that are harmful to the environment. Despite these negative environmental impacts, the utility of ethylene in commercial and medical industries has led researchers to investigate potential pathways for ethylene biosynthesis in recent decades. Previous studies have identified an ethylene-forming enzyme (EFE) that is involved in ethylene biosynthesis in microorganisms. Researchers have explored biochemical properties of EFE and strategies for maximizing enzyme expression and ethylene yield in recombinant organisms expressing the efe gene; however, it remains unclear whether ethylene biosynthesis involving EFE can produce the high ethylene yields necessary for commercial and medical use.

Research conducted in this project investigated ethylene biosynthesis as a potential alternative to conventional methods used to obtain ethylene. Experiments were conducted to analyze the structure and kinetic properties of EFE from Pseudomonas syringae. Preliminary research focused on enzyme isolation and purification from recombinant Escherichia coli engineered to express the efe gene. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was then used to analyze the kinetic properties of EFE and indirectly measure EFE ethylene production. Virtual reality technology was also used to explore the structure of EFE. The research results provide additional data necessary to evaluate the potential of ethylene biosynthesis via EFE to serve as an alternative method to obtain ethylene.