Location

Room 232, Schewel Hall

Access Type

Open Access

Start Date

4-17-2024 9:15 AM

End Date

4-16-2024 9:30 AM

College

Lynchburg College of Arts and Sciences

Department

Biology

Keywords

Blast injuries, Warning

Abstract

Disaster medicine is a division of medical care focused on immediate action in the field. Blast injuries can cause extreme injuries on impact meaning disaster medicine needs to be quick, efficient, and effective as possible. Medical professionals are facing an increase in blast-related injuries (Wolf et al., 2009). The military, paramedics, and organizations like the Red Cross use this branch of medicine. Blast injuries come from explosions caused by IEDs, pipe bombs, and household items malfunctioning. There is always room for improvement in medical care. How can we better understand the mechanism of injuries from blast explosions and improve disaster medicine? Understanding the mechanisms of injury caused by blast injuries can be beneficial in improving the medical treatments in the field. A tannerite explosive target was mixed into a container with metal shrapnel to give the effect of a bomb. Odocoileus virginianus' shoulder was placed on a metal stake to assess damages. The experimental procedure resulted in significant damage to the deer's shoulder. Shrapnel showed further damage with entrance wounds, some pieces remaining inside the tissue. Recreations of blast injuries on full-body virtual human and deer models were also created using an Anatomage table. The results from this experiment gave a closer look at the models, allowing new ideas of improvements and procedures related to injuries and infections in a field setting.

Faculty Mentor(s)

Dr. Wendy Willamson

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Apr 17th, 9:15 AM Apr 16th, 9:30 AM

Blast Injuries in Disaster Medcine

Room 232, Schewel Hall

Disaster medicine is a division of medical care focused on immediate action in the field. Blast injuries can cause extreme injuries on impact meaning disaster medicine needs to be quick, efficient, and effective as possible. Medical professionals are facing an increase in blast-related injuries (Wolf et al., 2009). The military, paramedics, and organizations like the Red Cross use this branch of medicine. Blast injuries come from explosions caused by IEDs, pipe bombs, and household items malfunctioning. There is always room for improvement in medical care. How can we better understand the mechanism of injuries from blast explosions and improve disaster medicine? Understanding the mechanisms of injury caused by blast injuries can be beneficial in improving the medical treatments in the field. A tannerite explosive target was mixed into a container with metal shrapnel to give the effect of a bomb. Odocoileus virginianus' shoulder was placed on a metal stake to assess damages. The experimental procedure resulted in significant damage to the deer's shoulder. Shrapnel showed further damage with entrance wounds, some pieces remaining inside the tissue. Recreations of blast injuries on full-body virtual human and deer models were also created using an Anatomage table. The results from this experiment gave a closer look at the models, allowing new ideas of improvements and procedures related to injuries and infections in a field setting.